The Luxury “Farm-to-Face” Skincare Brand That Believes Less Is More

Vintner's Daughter rē-imagines beauty for the skin, self, and planet

By: Jessica Ourisman
The Luxury “Farm-to-Face” Skincare Brand That Believes Less Is More

Vintner’s Daughter creates luxury, “farm-to-face” skincare, and while doing so, the green brand has been questioning some of the very premises of the beauty industry. Due to their overwhelming success as an indie skincare brand — creating a beauty oil with a cult-following that is well-known among beauty editors — their philosophy on skincare is making us rē-think the industry status quo.

Hailing from the wine country of Northern California, founder and CEO, April Gargiulo, created a brand whose philosophy begins and ends with the earth. Beyond its vineyard-informed savoir-faire, she thinks beyond the “maximalist” paradigm in skincare that fuels rapid consumption and product innovation as part of complex, elaborate beauty regimens. “We do not believe in an endless cycle of ‘new,’ which [creates] confusion for the customer and their skin. We believe in products that have such a deep communication with the skin that they become the products you never want to live without,” Gargiulo says.

Vintner’s Daughter bypasses the trend cycle altogether, creating just one (now two) hero products to add to your regimens, which they focus on making perfectly. This has meant committing to quality over quantity, and the brand has since grown, thrived, and cultivated a reputation that precedes them within beauty’s inner-circle. Here’s what they are doing differently.

Skinimalism Versus Maximalism: The Skincare Debate

Just like ‘fast fashion,’ the frenzied pace at which corporate beauty brands launch new products (as quickly as we can try them) poses environmental and ethical concerns. From the waste created, to mass methods of cultivation, and the sourcing of ingredients from cotton, to Mica, to Talc, the modern, conscious consumer prefers brands that source, formulate, and create more mindfully than in the past. 

This is because an emphasis on “new” and “more” is simply not sustainable. Gargiulo laments these brand strategies that capitalize upon insecurities about doing enough for your skincare regimens. “So much of the beauty world is built around the idea that more is better, and that if you aren’t doing a 16-step routine, [then] you aren’t ‘taking care of yourself,'” she says. “I could go on for days about the industrial beauty complex and all the ways in which it tries to subvert confidence in its consumer.”

But what if skincare maximalism is just an elaborate marketing scheme? We have already explored the ways that farm-to-table cuisine empowers individual and community wellness, and Vintner’s Daughter is the beauty counterpart — a farm-to-face brand that provides skincare-lovers with an alternative route, embracing the notion that less is more.

rē-Frame: Quality Over Quantity

Vintner’s Daughter prioritizes small, fresh, mindfully-made batches rather than mass-produced SKUs. “I come from Napa Valley, a community dedicated to making the finest wines in the world through meticulous attention to detail and craftsmanship,” she explains. “Short cuts are not allowed and practically every grain of dirt is considered for its quality. I believe that to make the finest of anything, whether that be a meal or skincare, you must begin with the highest quality raw materials.”

With the art of wine-making in her blood, the brand’s founding philosophy considers nature’s botanicals to be “the finest ingredients in the world” and maximizes their synergistic potency through an aging process that is reminiscent of the maturation of wine. “Our skincare philosophy rests in a deep reverence for the ancient wisdom and transformative power of plants,” she explains, noting that their whole botanicals are infused in a temperature-controlled environment for three weeks before their products are made. The end product imparts over sixty vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, phytoceramides, aminos, omegas, and more on the body’s largest organ: the skin.

vintners daughter owner respin

Giving Back to the Earth

The skincare brand also makes it a point to give back — one of our core pillars at rē•spin. “From the beginning, Vintner’s Daughter has donated 2% of every purchase to charitable organizations and nonprofits dedicated to protecting, educating, and empowering women and children around the world.” Each year, the brand selects over ten charities to donate to in the ultimate act of gratitude. “I believe it is our duty to give back — because gratitude means acknowledging all that has been given and joyfully giving in return.”

The brand’s core philosophy extends to its sustainability initiatives regarding sourcing, packaging, a commitment not to test on animals, and a newer Climate Neutral Certification that is extended to brands taking “immediate and rigorous” climate action to reduce their carbon footprint. Vintner’s Daughters’ efforts include two initiatives focused on reducing their use of post-consumer recycled or renewable materials, and shifting to local and certified green suppliers.

“We know which choice is better for our bodies, our environment, and our communities,” Gargiulo explains of naturally-derived, whole foods — sources of nutrients not just for our bodies, but also the skin. “Not only do we want to have a positive impact on our skin, but also on our world, and this starts with our fewer philosophy … fewer products are needed, fewer are produced, and less natural resources are utilized.”

Skinimalism, The Earth, and Wellness

Wellness is not simply about buying something new; it is about utilizing what you already have, from rē-cycling, to upcycling, to consuming and wasting less. And self-care is, in large part, a mind-set adopted while indulging in pauses set aside for wellness. This consciousness of using less to honor the earth is part of what you support when you buy from this “skinimalist” brand. Through their sustainability-minded business model and conscious craftsmanship of their products, they prove that paradoxically, it is possible to do more for your skin, the community, and the planet, all by using less.

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